Fellowship Training
  • In 2010, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) teamed up with Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO) to facilitate oncologists’ visits to low-resource countries overseas. Known as the International Cancer Corps (ICC), this partnership matches ASCO members who are interested in volunteering with opportunities in Honduras and Vietnam.

    VOLUME: 4:1
  • An oncologist must learn how to face the possibility—and very often the reality—of patient loss. For an oncologist-in-training, learning to cope with patient loss is difficult. Feelings of personal grief and sadness may confound the professional responsibility of dealing with terminally ill patients who are facing their own mortality or with families who are grieving the loss of a loved one.
    VOLUME: 4:1
  • Major changes are coming to the nation’s medical residency programs. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the nonprofit organization that evaluates and accredits more than 9,000 medical residency programs in the United States, has announced it will transform how these programs will be accredited in the years ahead.
    VOLUME: 4:1
  • Creating a smooth transition for patients from one cancer care setting to another is an important part of continuity of care. Although delivery of cancer care is improving, recent studies show that gaps still exist in the transition to palliative care. Oncology fellows can help bridge these gaps by enhancing their communication skills.
    VOLUME: 4:1
  • Although cultural factors such as age, gender, religion, or ethnic group can influence patients’ behaviors and attitudes toward cancer care, these differences can be minimized if physicians delve more deeply and ask patients open-ended questions, according to experts interviewed for this article.
    VOLUME: 4:1
  • When it comes to examinations, oncology fellows have been through the gamut: all the way from kindergarten spelling tests to the SATs, the MCATs, and the USMLE. But as training winds down, there’s one more exam to prepare for in order to become a fully fledged, practicing, board-certified oncologist: the oncology boards.
    VOLUME: 3:4
  • For many fellows, training to be an oncologist has been a trial by fire, especially when it comes to interpersonal issues in the hospital. Young oncologists often find themselves looking to senior faculty members while navigating the ins and outs of the hospital system, gaining the trust of patients and their families, and overcoming conflicts that arise. One group in Texas has developed an evidence-based model using a Socratic approach to fill this gap in training.
    VOLUME: 3:4
  • The first year of an oncology/hematology fellowship often requires fellows to absorb a daunting amount of information; after that, many feel more at ease as they transition into their second year, having gained a substantial amount of clinical knowledge.
    VOLUME: 3:4
  • Sometimes the best advice comes from people who have years of experience under their belt. To gather some pearls of wisdom, Oncology Fellow Advisor talked to 2 seasoned oncologists. Cathy Eng, MD, is associate professor and associate director of the Colorectal Center, Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas. Robin Zon, MD, is vice president and partner at Michiana Hematology-Oncology, PC, a practice with 15 oncologists and 6 locations in Indiana.
    VOLUME: 3:4
  • Hospitals in the United States are anxious to be included in the annual US News and World Report’s list of top hospitals. To make the 2011 to 2012 cut, cancer centers had to treat at least 254 inpatients with high-level expertise in 2007, 2008, and 2009.
    VOLUME: 3:3
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