Featured Articles: Vol. 4, Issue 1
Vol. 4, Issue 1

Jewish Hospital and Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is helping lead the fight against cancer through advances in genomic discovery and application, oncologic imaging and prevention.

Vol. 4, Issue 1

Orlando, Fla.—In recent years, a niche of medicine has sprung up to address the needs of adolescent and young adults (AYA) with cancer.

Vol. 4, Issue 1

In this issue, we interview Brian Lawenda, MD, clinical director of 21st Century Oncology in Las Vegas, Nevada, adjunct assistant professor in the Department of Radiation Oncology at Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, Indiana, and founder of IntegrativeOncology-Essentials.com. We are thrilled to include an oncologist  who is a social media enthusiast in this series.

Vol. 4, Issue 1

The medical profession has been facing a difficult challenge in recent years: a workforce shortage. Across the board, many specialties are seeing a decline in the number of physicians available to meet a growing demand. Because of an aging population, there are more elderly patients searching for care and more physicians are getting older and hitting prime retirement age. These factors are greatly affecting oncologists’ ability to treat patients.


Vol. 4, Issue 1

In 2010, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) teamed up with Health Volunteers Overseas (HVO) to facilitate oncologists’ visits to low-resource countries overseas. Known as the International Cancer Corps (ICC), this partnership matches ASCO members who are interested in volunteering with opportunities in Honduras and Vietnam.


Vol. 4, Issue 1

An oncologist must learn how to face the possibility—and very often the reality—of patient loss. For an oncologist-in-training, learning to cope with patient loss is difficult. Feelings of personal grief and sadness may confound the professional responsibility of dealing with terminally ill patients who are facing their own mortality or with families who are grieving the loss of a loved one.

Vol. 4, Issue 1

Major changes are coming to the nation’s medical residency programs. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the nonprofit organization that evaluates and accredits more than 9,000 medical residency programs in the United States, has announced it will transform how these programs will be accredited in the years ahead.

Vol. 4, Issue 1

The end of year 3 in fellowship training marks the formal coming of age for hematologists and oncologists. Year 3 fellows must take their training and experience into the next stage. In the final year, research projects have to take shape and many fellows are beginning to develop an expertise in a chosen field.

Vol. 4, Issue 1

At some point during training, oncology fellows will have to identify the career path they want to follow: private practice, academia, or industry. Finding the right fit largely has to do with identifying how they want to spend the bulk of their time, what their strengths and interests are, and how those strengths and interests align with the various career options.

Vol. 4, Issue 1

Although cultural factors such as age, gender, religion, or ethnic group can influence patients’ behaviors and attitudes toward cancer care, these differences can be minimized if physicians delve more deeply and ask patients open-ended questions, according to experts interviewed for this article.